More On Unbundling Legal Services

States Letting Lawyers Provide ‘A La Carte’ Menu of Legal Services was published today at Law.com.

The change is driven partly by judges and bar associations trying to help the overwhelming number of people representing themselves in court, or appearing pro se.

States Letting Lawyers Provide ‘A La Carte’ Menu of Legal Services was published today at Law.com.

The change is driven partly by judges and bar associations trying to help the overwhelming number of people representing themselves in court, or appearing pro se.

“It’s a response to the pro se dilemma throughout the country: Let’s try to get you some help when you need it, when you want it and in a manner that you can afford,” said John Norton, a Keene, N.H., attorney who worked on his state’s new rules and corresponding ethics rules for lawyers.

About 70 percent of family law cases in Maine and New Hampshire involve at least one person without a lawyer, court officials and lawyers say. The National Center for State Courts says there are no national statistics, but some states and other jurisdictions report comparable numbers, especially in family law and probate cases.

Timely followup to our post Some Pro Se Litigants Are Not As Divorced As They Thought They Were.

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